Your weekly drinking results

A few changes could make a difference to you

A few changes could make a difference to you

81%

You drink MORE than 81% of men your age

This week you've drank the equivalent of 9 doughnuts (not counting any other snacks or mixers!)
20
To burn off the calories that you've drank this week, you'd need to walk for 20 miles
How drinking less could benefit you

Drinking less gives you more energy.

Drinking too much can make you feel tired, sluggish and generally a bit under the weather. Drink less and it shouldn't take too long before you notice that you have more energy.

Save money.

If you start drinking less you should quickly start to see the money you're saving pile up. Keep this money in a safe place and use it as additional motivation. The less you drink the more you'll save!

Drinking less can help you sleep.

Regular drinking can affect the quality of your sleep, making you feel tired and sluggish. When you drink alcohol before bed you may fall into a deep sleep quicker, but as the night goes on you spend more time in the less restful Rapid Eye Movement (REM) stage of sleep. This can leave you feeling tired the next day, not matter how long you stay in bed. To help you sleep better, stop drinking earlier before bedtime. This will give your body time to process the alcohol you've drunk. On average it takes two hours to process a glass of wine or pint of beer. For more advice to help you sleep visit www.nhs.uk/livewell/sleep/pages/sleep-home.aspx

Click here to see more benefits of drinking less
Your top tips

Now we know more about how you drink, we'd like to suggest some simple tips that you could try using to drink less. You don't need to do them all. Pick what works best for you and your life.

Swap to a lower strength to cut your calories.

Knowing the alcoholic strength of what you are drinking is really quite important. A simple way to reduce the amount of alcohol and calories you're drinking is to swap strong beers or wines for ones with a lower strength. The strength can be seen on the side of cans/bottles and on pumps in pubs as "% ABV", which stands for alcohol by volume. This is sometimes written as "vol" or "alcohol volume". A 1% difference may not sound much but it adds up over a few drinks.

Find a way to relax that you like - that doesn't involve having a drink.

We all need ways to unwind from our busy lives. Drinking alcohol may make you feel relaxed at the time, but can make you feel worse afterwards. Simple activities like exercise, reading, yoga, playing music, cooking something new or making time for a hobby can all help you wind down. Find what works for you.

Steer clear of rounds.

Think of a good reason for avoiding rounds, and let your friends know before you start drinking. For example - you're losing weight, you're saving up, or you have something important to do in the morning. Another popular idea is only taking a limited amount of money (and no bank cards) out with you. If you don't want to drink at all, you could offer to be the designated driver. This will help you stay in control of how much you're drinking.

Keep less alcohol in the house.

If your house is always stocked up with alcohol you're more likely to drink it. Try buying less alcohol when you do the shopping and keep it out of sight at home to help avoid temptation.

Double your chances.

How many times have you filled a partner's glass without asking? Or maybe they regularly have a glass of wine or a beer waiting for you when you get home from work? You could be encouraging each other to drink more than you would really like. When you live with your partner it's easy to adopt each other's habits, without realising it. Many people find that cutting down with your partner means you can make plans together to avoid drinking too much such as agreeing not to drink on certain days. You can keep each other motivated too!

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